Thursday, December 31, 2015

Happy New Year!


"You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream."
-C.S. Lewis

Monday, December 28, 2015

FSPCA - Preventative Controls For Human Food Training Class is January 27th - 29th - Register Today!


The FSPCA training materials are designed to meet the requirements for training under Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations Part 117.155 for the Preventive Controls “Qualified Individual” who conducts Food Safety Plan activities such as developing and reviewing a food safety plan, validating preventive controls, verifying and validating process controls among others. Attending an FSPCA course will provide assurances that the course content and resulting knowledge is consistent with regulatory expectations. Each facility registered with the FDA is required to have a Preventive Control Qualified Individual PCQI.

A preventive controls qualified individual is a person who has successfully completed training in the development and application of risk-based preventive controls at least equivalent to that received under the standardized curriculum from FSPCA.

The FSPCA program is based on collaboration among federal and state regulatory officials (FDA), academic food safety researchers and educators, and U.S. food industry representatives. This program is delivered by a certified Lead Instructor by the FSPCA.

This course meets the Preventive Controls Qualified Individual Training requirements. The participants will receive FSPCA Preventive Controls Qualified Individual certificate issued by AFDO.

Includes: Morning and afternoon snack breaks, Lunch, Course Materials and Certificate of Attendance.

Parking – Free parking

Hotel Booking - Spring Hill Suites 707-253-1900

REGISTRATION CLOSES ON January 22, no refunds will be given after that date. Registrations may be transferred to another person from the same organization for the scheduled class. Cancellation fee before January 22/2016 $250.00

Friday, December 25, 2015

Merry Christmas!


May Your Days Be Merry and Bright...

Wishing You and Your Family a Very Merry Christmas!

Tuesday, December 22, 2015

Are You Ready for a Black Swan or the Unthinkable?

How Prepared Are You Really? Supply Chain Black Swans

by Alexa Cheater


Supply chain black swan 
Supply chain risk. It’s a topic that just never seems to go away (nor should it!). Everyone and their uncle has probably read at least one article, blog, research report, etc. on the topic. We’ve covered it here extensively on the 21st Century Supply Chain blog, and Kinaxis has even produced a great infographic about it. There’s no denying it’s a very important subject when it comes to good supply chain management.

Recently however, I’ve been thinking about supply chain risk in a whole other light. Thanks mostly to a fabulous guest post by MIT’s Yossi Sheffi on the Wall Street Journal, which I had the good fortune to stumble across. In it, Sheffi talks about the concept of a ‘black swan’, no not the risk of slightly unstable ballerinas invading your supply chain, but rather a term popularized in 2007 by Nassim Taleb that’s used to describe occurrences that are thought to be impossible.

At first blush, it all sounds a bit familiar. Make sure you prepare for the unexpected. Got it. We’ve long been proponents of making sure your supply chain risk management strategy targets three key areas: anticipated risk, uncontrolled anticipated risk, and unanticipated risk. Surely this concept of a black swan fits squarely into the third category, which is characterized by an event that is entirely out of our control and hard to anticipate and plan for. And it does.

But where I think a lot of people fall short, myself included, is taking the idea of completely unanticipated risk to the next level. Natural disasters are what most often come to mind for me when someone asks me about unanticipated supply chain risk, followed closely by global conflicts. I suspect that’s a direct result of my news junkie tendencies as those stories are most often covered on a wide scale.

Sheffi makes note of how companies with manned oil platforms in the Gulf of Mexico have emergency procedures in place in case of a hurricane. They’re designed to shut down production ahead of the threat and come back online as quickly as possible following the storm. It’s a great strategy, but all this talk of the impossible makes me wonder just how far reaching those supply chain risk plans go? What happens if the storm wipes out an entire drilling platform? Or ALL of them? Have those involved in creating the risk management strategies gone that far in their planning? Perhaps.

That however would then negate them from being a so-called black swan. Why? Because as Sheffi so aptly puts it, black swans “are never rehearsed because they are perceived as beyond-the-pale disruptions. Yet the likelihood of a black swan is not zero.” By creating, and practicing, any supply chain emergency procedures, you’re rehearsing.

So does that then mean we have to start thinking about even more impossible scenarios? Like aliens invading and demanding you ramp up production of a specific SKU in your supply chain by 300%. Improbable? Yes. Impossible? Well that depends on your beliefs on whether or not we’re alone in the universe.

Practically speaking, spending anything more than a couple of minutes contemplating the supply chain implications of these scenarios that live well beyond the farthest perceived edges of reality is probably not a very wise use of your time.

Does that then mean it truly is impossible to plan for these black swans? My answer is both yes and no. Yes in the sense that you will never be able to create a plan for every single imaginable scenario – because again, we’re talking about things so far-fetched you would never see them coming. Everything would be running smoothly and then BAM your supply chain is in shambles and you’re left scrambling to put the pieces back together.

No, because while you may not be able to guess, or even fathom, what could potentially happen to your supply chain, there are ways to manage your supply chain that will make it easier to respond to any supply chain risk or disruption – no matter if it’s an anticipated risk, an uncontrolled anticipated risk, or a completely unanticipated risk.

See Clearly

Seeing that you have a problem, or even a potential one, is the first step to solving it. That means having a unified view of your entire supply chain, both upstream and downstream.

Manage the Exceptions

Utilize exception-based notifications that call attention to urgent supply chain changes. Understand the context and impact of the problem and possible solutions so you can make an informed next step.

Collaborate Freely

Identify which suppliers and customers are impacted, and then bring together the necessary people to collaborate on possible resolutions. 

Be Agile

The ability to react quickly to any developing supply chain situation is critical. But be warned, it’s not just about the speed of implementing a solution. It’s also about the quickness of understanding the situation and its consequences. That means having a solution in place that allows for sensing and responding faster, but also trained staff who comprehend the situation and the outcomes. Do not just let the machine push the button! The human element is still a very important one no matter how sophisticated the technology you’re using.

With a few key changes to your supply chain risk management strategy, you can help minimize potential risks, and maximize the effectiveness of your response in case the totally unexpected really does happen.

What supply chain risk strategies has your organization put in place? Have you ever been caught off-guard by a completely unanticipated event? Let us know in the comments area below.

Article Source: http://blog.kinaxis.com/2015/12/how-prepared-are-you-really-supply-chain-black-swans/

Saturday, December 19, 2015

GFCP - Gluten Free Certification Program on February 26th - Sign Up Now for Early Bird Rates!


GFCP - Gluten Free Certification Program
When 
February 26, 2016 
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM (PST)

Location 
Napa Winery Inn, 
1998 Trower Ave, Napa CA 94558

Registration 
  • Early Bird Approved GFCP Auditor Training - Save $30 – $615.00 (USD) This ticket is for those intending to audit in the GFCP and sit for the exam portion of the training session. 
  • Early Bird GFCP Implementation Training - Save $30 – $465.00 (USD) This ticket should be purchased if you are not pursuing an Approved GFCP Auditor Designation for third party purposes. 

The Allergen Control Group in Association with Superior Food Safety will conduct a one-day Gluten-Free Certification Program (GFCP) training session for Food Safety and Quality Assurance Managers, Purchasing Managers, Supply Chain Personnel (from Industry), Experienced Food Safety Auditors, Food Safety & Quality Assurance Consultants, Internal Food Auditors and Food Safety Trainers wishing to learn more about implementing and auditing in the Program.

Those interested in learning about the production complexities, government regulations and the required customer compliances, associated with producing food products with a gluten-free claim on the label will find this course beneficial. Managing gluten as a chemical hazard and the many hidden sources throughout the manufacturing process, will go a long way to informing those attending this course to better understand how to prepare for or conduct a meaningful gluten-free audit.

Pre-screened and qualified Auditors will be asked to complete a final exam in order to receive an Approved GFCP Auditor Designation.

COURSE DURATION

1 Day

WHO SHOULD ATTEND

· Quality Assurance & Control Managers
· HACCP Coordinators
· Supply Chain Management Personnel & Purchasing Managers
· Food Safety & Quality Management Consultants
· Food Plant & Facility Managers
· Government & Food Regulatory Manager
· Auditors

COURSE CONTENT

· Importance of Senior management commitment
· Understand GFCP Standard & Policies & Requirements
· Understand the detail of the Scheme
· The GF market & consumer landscape
· Audit Report & Certification Process
· Audit/Auditor Overview and requirements
· Report writing
· Dealing with non-conformities
· Interactive workshops with case studies
· What is celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity?
· What is gluten?

Wednesday, December 16, 2015

Risk Assessment Challenges by Greg Hutchins



We have conducted hundreds of risk assessments in a number of sectors from homeland security to pension funds to Parks and Recreation departments. We have a number of hard lessons learned. These are some common mistakes we have made and seen:

  • Lack of a common definition of critical risk terms. This is probably the # 1 challenge that we have seen in conducting risk assessments. Everyone seems to have a different context, point of view, definition, and understanding of critical terms such as even basic terms of what is risk. The fix is to develop a common taxonomy, framework, and dictionary of risk, RBT, and risk management.
  • Lack of executive management support for the risk assessment. If a risk assessment is perceived as a low level activity or special project, then these can be early indicators of failure. The key is to have executive management support and follow a top down approach.
  • Lack of established ground rules for conducting the risk assessment. Without a set of commonly accepted and understood ground rules, the risk assessment process will get bogged down in disagreements, circular arguments, and positioning and posturing.
  • Lack of cultural or context understanding of the organization, function, or process being risk assessed. We have discussed context is worth 20 IQ points. We clearly understood this expression when we were conducting risk assessments of an organization that had an opaque culture and we were wondering why our estimates for the risk assessment were clearly wrong. We simply did not understand the organizational culture and did not include the right stakeholders in the assessment. We did not understand how the risk assessment was going to be used and the fear that it engendered.
  • Lack of technical understanding of the organization, function, or process being risk assessed. It is very difficult to establish a peer level dialogue for risk based problem solving and risk based decision making if the process owners do not perceive the facilitators as technical or management peers.
  • Lack of involvement of critical risk assessment While we planned the risk assessment carefully using a structured framework, we missed and did not consult with critical process owners. Critical process owners thought we were disregarding their expertise and dismissing them. Big mistake. The risk assessment took much longer than we anticipated and budgeted. Lesson Learned: Address each of the above challenges that are relevant to your organization in the business case. This will help ensure you have a realistic expectation of what is involved in RBT and becoming a risk aware organization
 
 

Sunday, December 13, 2015

Safety Controls in the Food Industry


The consequences of food-borne illness can be catastrophic not only for the consumers but also for retailers and other organisations in the supply chain. All organisations in the food chain should apply applicable basic hygienic practices to provide food which is safe and suitable for consumption. In deciding whether a requirement is necessary or appropriate, an assessment of the risk should be made using a HACCP approach to implementing a food safety management system (FSMS).

A fundamental part of achieving safe food is the implementation of a structured FSMS that is incorporated into the overall management activities of the organization. The Food Safety Management System should address quality and legal requirements in addition to food safety hazards. Food business operators are required to think logically about what might go wrong with the food that they sell and what they must do to ensure it is safe for their customers.

Implementing a HACCP based FSMS is essential in achieving food safety. The HACCP system and guidelines were developed Codex Alimentarius Commission and require a logical approach to assessing chemical, physical and biological hazards. Starting from a process flow diagram of the operation food business should assess which hazards need to be controlled at each step of the process. The key steps where control is needed are known as critical control points. Measures to control each hazard and the food safety limits should be established for each critical control point. Records of checks at critical control points should be completed as these will provide a due diligence defence if necessary.

Some organisations use both HACCP and ISO 9001 to form a food quality and food management system. ISO 9001 focuses on consumer satisfaction and one of the most important customer expectations is food safety so this is a logical approach. Applying HACCP within an ISO 9001 quality management system can result in a food safety management system that is more effective than implementing ISO 9001 or HACCP separately. Both HACCP and ISO 9001 provide systems work on the philosophy that prevention is better than cure although correction of problems or deficiencies is required when they occur.

When choosing a standard for their FSMS to be approved against many organisations select ISO 22000 Management Systems - Requirements for any organization in the food chain. ISO 22000 is an international standard that combines and supplements the core elements of ISO 9001 and HACCP to provide a framework for the development, implementation and continual improvement of a Food Safety Management System. It has core requirements for Food Management System General Requirements, Documentation Requirements, Management Responsibility, Management Commitment, Safe Food Policy, Planning Communication, Resource Management Infrastructure, Work Environment, Planning and Realization of Safe Products, Prerequisite Programmes, Hazard Analysis, Verification, Planning, Traceability, Control of Nonconformity, Validation, Monitoring and Measuring and Improvement. It would be reasonable to expect some element of these in any food safety management system.

Tony Connor is a colleague of the author and is especially interested in developing a quality management system for your organisation. There are many merits to the BRC food safety standard that he'd be happy to discuss.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Carl_Barton/2388

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4578693

Thursday, December 10, 2015

Superior Food Safety Testimonials


Superior Food Safety is based in Napa, CA and provides US and Latin American businesses with consulting and training for certification, implementation, management, and maintenance of FSMA and GFSI food safety and quality systems. Customized training is available to clients worldwide and all courses can be delivered in English or Spanish.

Testimonials:

Our plant received a 99 score on our first SQF audit thanks to Oscar Camacho’s training, support and extensive knowledge of food safety. Oscar’s Superior Food Safety team were encouraging and kept us focused and on task when the process seemed daunting. We have a better functioning Food Safety system and a better business as a result of Oscar's involvement.

Mary H. Johnson
SR. Vice President
TRANSMAR GROUP / Cocoa Services West

After attending the Safe Quality Food training with Oscar Camacho, our company has the necessary tools to implement a successful food safety system with a common sense approach. Our goal is now clear and attainable.

Cindy Sment, Controller
Young Guns Produce

Oscar was very detailed in his training sessions for implementing SQF as well as in the training for our HACCP Team and internal auditors. Without his superior knowledge, direction, expertise and encouragement, it would have been impossible to reach our goal of becoming certified.

Kevin Oliphant
Food Safety Manager – Advanced SQFP Professional Produce Inc.

Monday, December 7, 2015

Perishable Goods and HACCP Planning


Nowadays, hazard analysis critical control points (HACCP) planning is a critical part of the cold chain management. The protection of our food supply is significantly improved due to the recent food safety legislation that extends the powers of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the first of its kind change since 1938.

Rigid plans for monitoring and taking corrective actions are mandatory actions imposed by the new Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) in order to prevent the growth of foodborne pathogens and other contaminants in food products. Every registered food operation must perform a hazard analysis of their facilities and distribution assets in order to identify potential areas that endanger food safety and to then determine what preventive controls should be implemented preventing food specification violations.

Due to the Food Safety Modernization Act regulations, the Food and Drug Administration will depend upon qualified hazard analysis critical control points planning to estimate operational compliance as measured by inspectors and accredited third party auditors. The need for product recalls or mandated corrective actions will be determined by the credibility of the hazard analysis critical control points plan and verification that procedures were adhered to. The smooth running of the plan then resides in the ability of the food handler to monitor and document actions taken with end results. Therefore, whenever technologies that provide dependable monitoring and management of critical control points can be used the risk of a catastrophic event is greatly reduced and relationships with regulatory agencies and customers are enhanced predicated upon the dependability of actions taken and recorded.

In addition, following the FSMA regulations and enhancing the food safety preservation measures using professional tracking tools in order to manage and supervise in a real time manner the surroundings of refrigerated perishable goods will help businesses to reduce the amount of spoiled goods and losses, variables that up until now were considered to be a part of the food business. It is now the perfect time to diminuate the inventory shrinkage and gain a real competitive advantage.

An unique wireless technology was designed specifically to manage and verify real time temperatures and safety parameters surrounding refrigerated perishable goods throughout the supply chain. By incorporating this web based solution as part of their HACCP planning, all the involved parts regarding the food supply chain significantly improve their ability to prevent foodborne contamination illness or any intentional terrorist type deterioration of products they manage.

To learn about Cooltrax solutions, view a demo, or request a 30-day hassle-free trial, visit www.cooltrax.com.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Tom_Chicoine/1295892

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7147442

Friday, December 4, 2015

Still Time to Register for Training Classes


Superior Food Safety, Manex and Heffernan Insurance Brokers
Invite you to attend training classes in the Napa Valley, California
December 9, 10, 11th from 8:00am to 5:00pm

IMPLEMENTING SQF-SQF CODE, 7.2 EDITION
Two Day Course - December 9, 10 (Napa Winery Inn)

The goals of the Implementing SQF course are to:
  • Promote an understanding of the SQF Code.
  • Create a knowledge base to facilitate the successful implementation of an SQF System.
  • Show how a HACCP-based approach manages food safety and quality hazards in an operation.

Course Content Outline
  • Section 1. SQF Overview
  • Section 2. Preparing for SQF Certification
  • Section 3. SQF Certification Process
  • Section 4. SQF Certification Process (HACCP and HACCP for Quality)
  • Section 5. SQF Systems Elements
  • Section 6. Food Safety Fundamentals and Prerequisite Programs

INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL GFSI AUDITS WORKSHOP
One Day Course - December 11 (Napa Winery Inn)

The goals of the Internal and External GFSI Audits course are to:

Provide and improve the knowledge, skills and abilities required by GSFI auditors, food industry professionals and internal auditors on:
  • Food Safety Management Systems
  • Good Manufacturing Practices and Good Agricultural Practices
  • HACCP Program
  • Review ISO-19011 Auditing Principles
  • Gain understanding of the GFSI schemes (SQF, BRC, FSSC2200, Global G.A.P.) from the auditor point of view

This workshop complies with the training requirements for GFSI professionals and Internal auditors for GFSI approved schemes (SQF, BRC, FSSC22000, Global G.A.P. among others)

This workshop has been designed by MSc. Oscar Camacho with more than 28 years of experience managing Food Safety and Quality Systems in the food industry, and based on the weaknesses found with his customers while providing auditing and consulting services.

Download flyer for complete details and pricing

Tuesday, December 1, 2015

SQF IA Training in Napa December 9th, 10th, 11th - Sign Up Now


IMPLEMENTING SQF-SQF CODE, 7.2 EDITION
Two Day Course - December 9, 10 (Napa Winery Inn)

The goals of the Implementing SQF course are to:
  • Promote an understanding of the SQF Code.
  • Create a knowledge base to facilitate the successful implementation of an SQF System.
  • Show how a HACCP-based approach manages food safety and quality hazards in an operation.

Course Content Outline
  • Section 1. SQF Overview
  • Section 2. Preparing for SQF Certification
  • Section 3. SQF Certification Process
  • Section 4. SQF Certification Process (HACCP and HACCP for Quality)
  • Section 5. SQF Systems Elements
  • Section 6. Food Safety Fundamentals and Prerequisite Programs

INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL GFSI AUDITS WORKSHOP
One Day Course - December 11 (Napa Winery Inn)

The goals of the Internal and External GFSI Audits course are to:

Provide and improve the knowledge, skills and abilities required by GSFI auditors, food industry professionals and internal auditors on:
  • Food Safety Management Systems
  • Good Manufacturing Practices and Good Agricultural Practices
  • HACCP Program
  • Review ISO-19011 Auditing Principles
  • Gain understanding of the GFSI schemes (SQF, BRC, FSSC2200, Global G.A.P.) from the auditor point of view

This workshop complies with the training requirements for GFSI professionals and Internal auditors for GFSI approved schemes (SQF, BRC, FSSC22000, Global G.A.P. among others)

This workshop has been designed by MSc. Oscar Camacho with more than 28 years of experience managing Food Safety and Quality Systems in the food industry, and based on the weaknesses found with his customers while providing auditing and consulting services.

Download flyer for complete details and pricing

Saturday, November 28, 2015

HACCP Food Safety - Keep Safe Through Seven Principles


If you're in the business of selling edible items, you might want to take a look at HACCP food safety principles. Standards for keeping edibles safe for consumption is a basic requirement, but the concepts outlined in the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points take safe practices to a whole new level.

There are seven principles to look into. In general though, what the system seeks to accomplish is to prevent contamination at all levels of production from preparation to distribution. The stress on prevention instead of post production detection is ideal because looking into each critical step before distribution ensures that no minute hazard or contaminant is missed. What exactly are these principles?

The first principle stresses analyzing hazards. This is the step where possible hazards are identified for all stages in production. In an internal food safety audit an auditor can identify elements that are chemical, biological or physical in nature. Hazards can take the form of microbes, toxins or physical particles.

After identifying potential hazards, the second principle moves on to determine the control points in which contamination can be prevented. Establishing control points can be as simple as outlining a procedure such as raw item handling, cooking, packing and distribution.

The third principle combines the concepts behind the first and second principles. At this level maximum or minimum limits are set for each of the specific control points to prevent contamination. The most basic example is minimum heat settings for cooking specific edible items.

The fourth HACCP food safety principle organizes the third principle by defining procedures and persons responsible for monitoring control points. This means that there is clear documentation to follow on how each step of production is checked and who performs these regular checks.

The fifth principle focuses on taking corrective measures in case checks show that standards are not met. This may entail going back to the first stage of the production process or completely throwing out potentially contaminated items before they can be pushed out to consumers. Corrective steps have to be identified in advance so that it is clear what steps need to be taken in the event of contamination.

The sixth HACCP food safety audit principle involves checking the system of monitoring itself. There should be a regular process in place that looks into equipment or tools that are needed for monitoring the production process. Monitoring devices and the different parts of the tools used in production should be in top condition to make monitoring effective and successful.

The seventh and last principle revolves around documentation. Every part of the system from hazard analysis to monitoring device evaluation should have detailed guidelines in place. Furthermore, these should be based on standards that are based on accepted and proven scientific research.

There is no doubt that following HACCP food safety principles is crucial primarily because it is the best way to ensure consumer well being. From a business perspective, it is also worth noting that following these principles is also essential to secure better business results. You'll be in business longer and have more clients if you make sure you have a solid system that can keep customers healthy and happy.

Build A Stronger Business With A Food Safety Auditor. Find One At http://www.iconsultingsolutions.com.au.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Hayley_Martin/621325

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4751065

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

Happy Thanksgiving!


"It is not happy people who are thankful: it is thankful people who are happy."

Wishing You and Your Family a Safe and Happy Thanksgiving!

Sunday, November 22, 2015

Superior Food Safety Consulting Services


Using “Do the Right Thing” ® proprietary methodology, Superior Food Safety’s expert will visit your site and evaluate your company’s current food safety system against GFSI and regulatory requirements. Using strong analytical skills, the expert will identify any gaps in your existing Food Safety Culture, Food Safety System Designs, and Food Safety Requirements. Once the gap analysis is completed, our expert will recommend specific strategies, forecast systematic issues and create a Project Timeline for the improvement and/or total implementation of a reliable, cost-effective food safety program. Superior Food Safety’s “Do the Right Thing” methodology has been proven successful in helping clients achieve GFSI certification audits with good to excellent scores.

GFSI systems and FSMA

Superior Food Safety assists employees from diverse backgrounds at low and high-risk food manufacturing plants as they implement, manage, and maintain FSMA compliance programs and GFSI systems (SQF, BRC, FSSC2200, IFS, etc.). Our proprietary methodology, Do The Right Thing ® ,is based on core principles of integrity and personal responsibility – the key factors in all successful food safety operations. This unique methodology helps our clients develop and build their own Risk Management Culture ® that forms the foundation of all future safety endeavors in their organization.

Step One
GFSI / FSMA Gap Analysis 
The first step toward compliance is the evaluation of your current food safety programs against FSMA or GFSI system requirements. This involves an extensive review of your documents, building, processing equipment, employee practices, current food safety system design, and company culture. This process gives us a big picture understanding of the gaps in your system and helps identify exactly where change needs to be implemented to meet industry and government safety standards.

Step two
System Design 
The gap analysis provides the information needed to determine if your company requires re-designation of food safety responsibilities. It is important that responsibilities are aligned with each manager’s job description and line of command. Clearly defined responsibilities and a well-designed chain of command foster personal accountability and system-wide success.

Step Three
Budget Evaluation 
It is also crucial that managers know how to correctly calculate the budget for a comprehensive food safety system. Superior Food Safety helps you anticipate and budget for capital projects, building and equipment updates, consulting services, training, and other system necessities. Clearly identifying these costs is the first step to ensure that senior management commits the required resources for the success of the implementation phase.

Step Four
Project Timeline 
Once the responsibilities are designated and the resources allocated, Superior Food Safety builds the project timeline and recommends a deadline to meet FSMA compliance or achieve GFSI certification. In this phase, your company will designate a Project Manager and a GFSI or FSMA Steering Management Team that will be meeting on a regular basis to follow up on project status for support and accountability. It is crucial that senior management be represented on this team as a demonstration of management commitment.

Step Five
Collaborative Project Website 
Superior Food Safety’s role in the execution phase is to provide support and technical guidance. Your company owns and executes the system. We have developed a state-of-the-art collaborative web-based system linked to companies’ and consultants’ e-mails that allows real-time tracking of project status, online training, and review of documents. This collaborative, project management site ensures everyone’s accountability and support.

Step Six
Management Training
Superior Food Safety will deliver customized training on how to use the website and other tools for tracking and maintaining selected FSMA or GFSI standards. Each manager responsible for each task must gain a perfect understanding of the execution phase.

Step Seven
Project Execution 
The team will start the execution of the project after all the previous steps have been completed. Superior Food Safety’s role will be to support, guide, review and approve documentation as needed. We are also available to execute internal audits, HACCP reviews and validation and verification procedures.

Thursday, November 19, 2015

SQF IA Training in Napa December 9th, 10th, 11th - Sign Up Before Tomorrow for Early Bird Rates!!

Register Before November 20th for Early Bird Rates! 

IMPLEMENTING SQF-SQF CODE, 7.2 EDITION
Two Day Course - December 9, 10 (Napa Winery Inn)

The goals of the Implementing SQF course are to:
  • Promote an understanding of the SQF Code.
  • Create a knowledge base to facilitate the successful implementation of an SQF System.
  • Show how a HACCP-based approach manages food safety and quality hazards in an operation.

Course Content Outline
  • Section 1. SQF Overview
  • Section 2. Preparing for SQF Certification
  • Section 3. SQF Certification Process
  • Section 4. SQF Certification Process (HACCP and HACCP for Quality)
  • Section 5. SQF Systems Elements
  • Section 6. Food Safety Fundamentals and Prerequisite Programs

INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL GFSI AUDITS WORKSHOP
One Day Course - December 11 (Napa Winery Inn)

The goals of the Internal and External GFSI Audits course are to:

Provide and improve the knowledge, skills and abilities required by GSFI auditors, food industry professionals and internal auditors on:
  • Food Safety Management Systems
  • Good Manufacturing Practices and Good Agricultural Practices
  • HACCP Program
  • Review ISO-19011 Auditing Principles
  • Gain understanding of the GFSI schemes (SQF, BRC, FSSC2200, Global G.A.P.) from the auditor point of view

This workshop complies with the training requirements for GFSI professionals and Internal auditors for GFSI approved schemes (SQF, BRC, FSSC22000, Global G.A.P. among others)

This workshop has been designed by MSc. Oscar Camacho with more than 28 years of experience managing Food Safety and Quality Systems in the food industry, and based on the weaknesses found with his customers while providing auditing and consulting services.

Download flyer for complete details and pricing

Tuesday, November 17, 2015

SQF IA Training in Napa December 9th, 10th, 11th - Sign Up for Early Bird Registration Ending Soon!

 
IMPLEMENTING SQF-SQF CODE, 7.2 EDITION
Two Day Course - December 9, 10 (Napa Winery Inn)

The goals of the Implementing SQF course are to:
  • Promote an understanding of the SQF Code.
  • Create a knowledge base to facilitate the successful implementation of an SQF System.
  • Show how a HACCP-based approach manages food safety and quality hazards in an operation.

Course Content Outline
  • Section 1. SQF Overview
  • Section 2. Preparing for SQF Certification
  • Section 3. SQF Certification Process
  • Section 4. SQF Certification Process (HACCP and HACCP for Quality)
  • Section 5. SQF Systems Elements
  • Section 6. Food Safety Fundamentals and Prerequisite Programs

INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL GFSI AUDITS WORKSHOP
One Day Course - December 11 (Napa Winery Inn)

The goals of the Internal and External GFSI Audits course are to:

Provide and improve the knowledge, skills and abilities required by GSFI auditors, food industry professionals and internal auditors on:
  • Food Safety Management Systems
  • Good Manufacturing Practices and Good Agricultural Practices
  • HACCP Program
  • Review ISO-19011 Auditing Principles
  • Gain understanding of the GFSI schemes (SQF, BRC, FSSC2200, Global G.A.P.) from the auditor point of view

This workshop complies with the training requirements for GFSI professionals and Internal auditors for GFSI approved schemes (SQF, BRC, FSSC22000, Global G.A.P. among others)

This workshop has been designed by MSc. Oscar Camacho with more than 28 years of experience managing Food Safety and Quality Systems in the food industry, and based on the weaknesses found with his customers while providing auditing and consulting services.

Download flyer for complete details and pricing

Sunday, November 15, 2015

SQF IA Training in Napa December 9th, 10th, 11th - Sign Up for Early Bird Discounts

 
IMPLEMENTING SQF-SQF CODE, 7.2 EDITION
Two Day Course - December 9, 10 (Napa Winery Inn)

The goals of the Implementing SQF course are to:
  • Promote an understanding of the SQF Code.
  • Create a knowledge base to facilitate the successful implementation of an SQF System.
  • Show how a HACCP-based approach manages food safety and quality hazards in an operation.

Course Content Outline
  • Section 1. SQF Overview
  • Section 2. Preparing for SQF Certification
  • Section 3. SQF Certification Process
  • Section 4. SQF Certification Process (HACCP and HACCP for Quality)
  • Section 5. SQF Systems Elements
  • Section 6. Food Safety Fundamentals and Prerequisite Programs

INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL GFSI AUDITS WORKSHOP
One Day Course - December 11 (Napa Winery Inn)

The goals of the Internal and External GFSI Audits course are to:

Provide and improve the knowledge, skills and abilities required by GSFI auditors, food industry professionals and internal auditors on:
  • Food Safety Management Systems
  • Good Manufacturing Practices and Good Agricultural Practices
  • HACCP Program
  • Review ISO-19011 Auditing Principles
  • Gain understanding of the GFSI schemes (SQF, BRC, FSSC2200, Global G.A.P.) from the auditor point of view

This workshop complies with the training requirements for GFSI professionals and Internal auditors for GFSI approved schemes (SQF, BRC, FSSC22000, Global G.A.P. among others)

This workshop has been designed by MSc. Oscar Camacho with more than 28 years of experience managing Food Safety and Quality Systems in the food industry, and based on the weaknesses found with his customers while providing auditing and consulting services.

Download flyer for complete details and pricing

Thursday, November 12, 2015

HACCP Standards


Most foodservice companies are spot-checked by health inspectors for cleanliness and correct foods temperatures, and cited for code violations. Too many restaurants try to please the inspector, when what they ought to be doing is striving for clean, safe conditions simply because it's the right thing to do, day in and day out.

The foods safety system that's been in use since the 1960s is HACCP-Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points, which was developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to evaluate its methods of assuring that all foods produced for U.S. astronauts were free of bacterial pathogens. Nothing might be worse than having gastrointestinal difficulties in space! Even these days, decades later, HACCP is considered the absolute standard for food security, far a lot more efficient than simply spot-checking for violations.

It combines up-to-date technical info with step-by-step procedures to help operators evaluate and monitor the flow of food through their facilities. The core objective from the process would be to identify and manage the 3 types of foods security threats in any commercial kitchen:

1. Biological contaminants or microorganisms. These include bacteria, viruses, and/or parasites, which already exist in and on many raw foods products and can be passed on by unknowing employees or clients.

2. Chemical contaminants. These can come from improper storage or handling of cleaning items or pesticides, from cross-contamination, or from substitutions of certain recipe ingredients.

3. Physical contaminants. These are the most common cause of food contamination-foreign objects within the foods, including hair, bits of plastic or glass, metal slivers, and the like-which can be deadly if choked on. You will find seven basic HACCP actions:

1. Identify hazards and assess their severity and risks.

2. Figure out critical control factors (CCPs) in foods preparation.

3. Determine important control limits (CCLs) for each CCP identified.

4. Monitor important control factors and record data.

5. Take corrective action whenever monitoring indicates a critical limit is exceeded.

6. Establish effective record-keeping system to document HACCP program.

7. Establish procedures to verify that HACCP program is functioning.

The first step would be to choose what hazards exist at every stage of a food's journey via your kitchen and decide how serious each is in terms of your overall security priorities. On your own checklist, this may include these items: Reviewing recipes, paying careful attention to times for thawing, cooking, cooling,
reheating, and handling of leftovers.

Giving employees thermometers and/or temperature probes and teaching them how to use them. Correctly calibrating these devices. Inspecting all fresh and frozen produce upon delivery. Requiring hand-washing at certain points within the foods preparation process and showing employees the right way to wash for maximum sanitation. Adding quick-chill capability to cool foods more quickly in amounts over 1 gallon or four pounds.

You will find as many of these possibilities as there are restaurants. The second action is to identify critical control factors (CCPs). This means any point or process in your system where loss of control might result in a wellness risk. If workers use the same cutting boards to dice veggies and debone chickens without washing them between uses, that is a CCP in require of improvement.

Vendor delivery vehicles ought to be inspected for cleanliness; product temperatures should be kept within five degrees of optimum; expiration dates on food items should be clearly marked; utensils should be sanitized; and the list goes on and on. The third action would be to determine the standards and limits for what is appropriateand what isn't, in each of the CCP areas, for your kitchen.

The fourth action within the HACCP program would be to monitor all the steps you pinpointed in Action two for a specific period of time, to be sure every area of concern is taken care of correctly.
Some CCPs may remain on the list indefinitely, for constant monitoring; others, once you get the procedure right, might be removed from the list after several months. Still others may be added to the monitoring list as required.

Step 5 kicks in whenever you see that one of the "critical limits" (set in Step 3) has been exceeded, and corrective action should be taken. Action 6 demands that you simply document this whole procedure. Without documentation, it's hard at best to chart whatever progress your facility may be making. If there's a problem that impacts customer wellness or security, having written records is also very essential.Finally, action 7 requires that you establish a procedure to verify whether the HACCP program is functioning for you.

This might mean a committee that meets frequently to discuss wellness and security issues and to go more than the documentation needed in Step six. Despite its thorough and science-based method to foods safety, some operators are reluctant to make use of the HACCP plan, simply because of its technical language and also the fair amount of procedural discipline and documentation it involves.

For this reason, in June 2005, the U.S. Department of Agriculture released a new, simpler set of implementation guidelines aimed at school foodservice. Unfortunately, the name is as unwieldy as some believe is the HACCP plan itself: "Guidelines for School Food Authorities Developing a School 

Food Security Plan Based on the Procedure Method to HACCP Principles." Francesco Zinzaro has been involved with online marketing for nearly 3 years and likes to write on various subjects. Come visit his latest website which discusses of Restaurant Fridges and fridges supplies for the owner of his own business.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Francesco_Zinzaro/478030

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Monday, November 9, 2015

Thank You Napa Chamber of Commerce!


Superior Food Safety would like to thank the Napa Chamber of Commerce for a great event on October 29th. We were able to have a booth and showcase our business at the Napa Fairgrounds. We were also able to meet and collaborate with many other businesses in the region. If you would like more information about the Napa Chamber of Commerce go to www.napachamber.com.

If you are in the food manufacturing industry and would like consulting or training for food safety please visit us at www.superiorfoodsafety.com.

Friday, November 6, 2015

SQF IA Training in Napa December 9th, 10th, 11th - Sign Up for Early Bird Discounts

 
IMPLEMENTING SQF-SQF CODE, 7.2 EDITION
Two Day Course - December 9, 10 (Napa Winery Inn)

The goals of the Implementing SQF course are to:
  • Promote an understanding of the SQF Code.
  • Create a knowledge base to facilitate the successful implementation of an SQF System.
  • Show how a HACCP-based approach manages food safety and quality hazards in an operation.

Course Content Outline
  • Section 1. SQF Overview
  • Section 2. Preparing for SQF Certification
  • Section 3. SQF Certification Process
  • Section 4. SQF Certification Process (HACCP and HACCP for Quality)
  • Section 5. SQF Systems Elements
  • Section 6. Food Safety Fundamentals and Prerequisite Programs

INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL GFSI AUDITS WORKSHOP
One Day Course - December 11 (Napa Winery Inn)

The goals of the Internal and External GFSI Audits course are to:

Provide and improve the knowledge, skills and abilities required by GSFI auditors, food industry professionals and internal auditors on:
  • Food Safety Management Systems
  • Good Manufacturing Practices and Good Agricultural Practices
  • HACCP Program
  • Review ISO-19011 Auditing Principles
  • Gain understanding of the GFSI schemes (SQF, BRC, FSSC2200, Global G.A.P.) from the auditor point of view

This workshop complies with the training requirements for GFSI professionals and Internal auditors for GFSI approved schemes (SQF, BRC, FSSC22000, Global G.A.P. among others)

This workshop has been designed by MSc. Oscar Camacho with more than 28 years of experience managing Food Safety and Quality Systems in the food industry, and based on the weaknesses found with his customers while providing auditing and consulting services.

Download flyer for complete details and pricing

Tuesday, November 3, 2015

Superior Food Safety Training Services



Superior Food Safety training is offered at top facilities in beautiful downtown Napa in the heart of California wine country. While receiving the best in food safety training, our clients also enjoy exceptional weather, stunning nearby countryside vistas and access to some of the world’s best restaurants and wineries. We also provide customized, on-site training for our clients worldwide. All classes are offered in English and in Spanish.

Our highly praised training services cover all prerequisite programs for Food Safety Management Systems, HACCP and FSMA. We are developing more detailed training in areas such as Food Defense, Preventative Controls and HARPC, Integrated Pest Management Systems, Environmental Monitoring, Crisis Management, Food Safety and Quality Continuous Improvement, among other offerings.

At these more detailed training sessions, Superior Food Safety welcomes experts who enrich our course offerings with their deep experiences in various food safety fields. If your concern is food defense, for example, we would offer an expert who teaches the steps needed to guard against bioterrorism and outside threats to your company’s food safety.

Whatever your needs, Superior Food Safety can gather the necessary resources to present you with the training and expertise that will set you on the path for success.

Saturday, October 31, 2015

Voices of FSMA: The Road to Implementation



Implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) involves people at all segments of the food supply chain, from farm to table. On April 23-24, 2015, FDA held a public meeting in Washington D.C. to discuss its plans to implement FSMA rules designed to build a food safety system that focuses on prevention and risk. The meeting drew hundreds of people in person and thousands joined the webcast. They included consumers, growers, manufacturers, importers, advocates, state and federal government officials, and representatives from other nations. This first of four video blogs focuses on the insights of FDA leaders.

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Superior Food Safety Offers Expert Advice and Training



Superior Food Safety provides expert advice and training to ensure that our clients implement and maintain effective food safety systems.

Methodology

Using our proprietary Do the Right Thing methodology, Superior Food Safety helps its clients:
  • Do the right thing by instilling a work ethic of commitment, accountability and consciousness
  • Identify gaps in food safety systems
  • Design food safety and quality management systems for effectiveness and cost efficiency
  • Assign responsibilities to ensure accountability
  • Achieve and maintain high-scoring certification

Difference

Superior Food Safety’s key differentiator is our knowledge of how to organize for success. We don’t just tell you what’s missing in your food safety system, we show you how to make the right managers responsible and accountable for each program. We give you the tools to restructure your chain of command and establish clear responsibilities and timelines, regular follow-up practices and efficient tracking procedures. The result is an efficient and effective food safety and quality program that rewards integrity, reduces associated risks and protects your business and the health of your consumers.

Sunday, October 25, 2015

The Rich History of Food Service Packaging


Before recorded history and into the early days of civilization, food was simply consumed where it was found. Life itself revolved around the availability and proximity of food. Some nomadic tribes of people roamed to follow the food, focusing their entire society around the whims of animals like buffalo and antelope. Other civilizations focused more on agriculture, however - the fact still remained the same, the food they found, killed, or produced generally stayed where it was.

Generally, when packaging was needed for food - nature provided all the packaging required, from shells and husks to gourds and animal skins. However, as trade became more important and technology more advanced, food packaging became much more advanced (and effective) as well. With food being sold, exchanged, and transported over miles and miles, the need for reliable packaging increased drastically.

First, containers and packages were made from natural materials, like grass, reeds, logs, and animal parts. These materials were woven into baskets and used to store and transport food with a relative degree of safety. Eventually, boxes were created out of wood for the same purpose. Which leads us to the discovery of metals and ceramics - leading to bigger, better, and more versatile food packaging solutions.

To get an idea of the timeline for food packaging throughout the ages, consider the following:
  • 20,000 years ago indigenous people used natural materials to package their food and transport it over small distances.
  • Roughly 8,000 to 10,000 years ago, ceramics began to come into use in the middle east, expanding the possibilities when it came to storage and transportation.
  • Approximately 5,000 years ago, according to archaeologists that have unearthed Egyptian tombs, food storage got even more complex when the Egyptian people actually used wood barrels, crates, and boxes for storage.
  • 3500 years ago the mass production of ceramics, the invention of the pottery wheel, and the widespread use of pottery enabled cultures to transport perishables further than ever before.
  • 2,500 years ago glass containers came into prominence when the Syrians developed glass blowing. Combined with various forms of sealing glass, this method of food packaging brought transportation and preservation to new levels.
  • 2,000 years ago - paper-like fibers began to be used for various forms of wrapping and packaging

In the Last 1,000 years, the innovation brought to food packaging has been groundbreaking. With global borders falling away, trade flourishing, and the need for more effective protection, transport, and preservation - wood crates, metal packaging, and specially treated cardboard packaging has come into prominence to deliver the reliability societies everywhere expect.

Studies have indicated that in many countries, subpar food packaging has resulted in astounding losses. For example, one study showed that Russian food transportation in the 1980's was so poor, that nearly 45 percent of fresh vegetables and 50 percent of fresh fruit and grain was were lost to bad packaging. That same study explained that over 2 million tons of fish and meat were also spoiled as a result of ineffective foodservice packaging.

This isolated example helps to illustrate the developing importance of effective food packaging throughout history, which explains the many notable advances in packaging that we've seen in the 20th century. These have included the invention of aluminum foil and cans (1950s), cellulose packaging (1950s), heat shrinkable plastic (1958), foam (1930-1950), and PEET containers (1977).

Horace Moody is a writer interested in the things we frequently tend to overlook. Recently, he's been interested in the history of food service packaging and its influence on technology and society.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Horace_Moody/917692

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Thursday, October 22, 2015

3 Important Components of Food Safety Standards


There may be several food safety standards, but their goal is always the same. Each set of rules aims to ensure that food items will not cause harm to consumers. There are no distinct boundaries to tell these standards apart, although there are different ways to look at it. These regulations can be grouped according to food service, import or distribution. Each division is governed by different agencies, which may enforce diverse sets of standards:

1. Imports

Food safety standards that deal with this division are the most widespread among all regulations. Government agencies for agriculture are usually in control of these standards. Politics may also play an influential role in decision-making, especially since this division deals with trade and import. European countries, for instance, have firmer rules on importing genetically modified crops compared to the United States. Some countries may also restrict dairy products made with unpasteurized milk.

2. Distribution

Another way to look at food safety standards is through distribution. Processing is an example of this division. Most cases of contamination begin during production and processing, which is why prevention is crucial at this stage. Standards that focus on this division emphasize the importance of stopping contamination at an early level, before it causes widespread harm. A country-wide contamination can easily spread to a full-blown worldwide disaster if food safety is not practiced from the very beginning. Not only will it require immense effort in recalling contaminated items, but food safety malpractice may also lead to poisoning and illness. Both consequences have an enormous impact on the country's economy and may lead to greater expenses and losses in profit.

The national agency of agriculture is held responsible for making sure that standards in distribution are met. All methods and precautions should be exercised to prevent cross-contamination and ensure food sanitation.

3. Food Service

Food safety regulations that are included in this division are more focused on food presentation and handling. This includes maintaining the appropriate temperature in salad bars and storage freezers. Meat and poultry should be prepared in accordance with the recommended heat level. Otherwise, consumers should at least be informed that the meat was undercooked. For instance, customers may have different preferences with how their steak is prepared.

Good hygiene goes hand in hand with food safety. Employees who are directly in contact with food items should practice proper hygiene in food preparation and handling. The local health department is in charge of implementing these guidelines in the food service industry. Depending on the government, these policies may require overall hygiene in the workplace and service area. Some employees are even encouraged to wear hairnets while preparing food.

Food safety should not be taken lightly, especially by those who are engaged in the food service industry. Business who are non-compliant to these standards are at risk of losing their license to operate, and may even be required to pay fines. The local government reprimands uncooperative businesses by revoking their licenses until proper action is taken.

If you're interested in earning a Food Hygiene Certificate [http://www.foodhygienecertificateguide.com], we have more great tools and resources on our website [http://www.foodhygienecertificateguide.com]
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Kathleen_G_Hill/865860

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Monday, October 19, 2015

What Important Standards Do Food Manufacturers Need to Follow?


It is the industry which directly affects the health and well-being of people. This is the reason that renowned food organizations like FDA in the USA show concern in setting up standards for the industry. Its around the world need to abide by these standards religiously.

The food products manufactured in one country are exported to the global consumers. As a result, there is need to follow international food manufacturing standards that maintain the quality of manufactured food products in different categories. Here is a discussion about the most important standards that food manufacturing industry follows internationally.

Standards for Workers

To begin with, its need to follow the standards for the workers who perform different tasks related to food manufacturing phases. These workers are required to be healthy and they should not suffer from issues like skin allergies and other diseases that are communicable in nature. Moreover, it companies must ensure that the workers suffering from temporary problems like lesions and wounds are not allowed to perform activities that require direct touching of food and equipments.

Food Manufacturing Sites

Among the most important regulations and standards that food manufacturers must follow are related to hygiene of the food manufacturing sites. These sites must be located at hygienic places and should not be surrounded by contaminated water resources and dumping grounds. Going further, there must be arrangement for cleaning the food manufacturing sites to prevent the growth of bacteria. Another important requirement is to control pests that may infect the food with disease causing germs.

Food Manufacturing Equipment

It must take care of purchasing standard equipments for various processes. It is also important to clean the equipments after regular sessions of food processing. Regular inspection of these equipments against cracks and wear and tear must also be conducted to keep them in the good form.

Manufacturing Safety Standards

There must be good safety standards which must be followed by it at their manufacturing sites. Protective clothing, gloves and hair nets must be provided to the workers. Moreover, it is important that these workers undergo training before they start working at different equipments.

Waste Management Standards

Like other manufacturing industries, the food manufacturing industry too produces waste in the form of solid, liquid and gaseous wastes. Its need to follow standards to dispose different types of wastes in the most suitable manners. In other words, the manufacturing sites must not contribute towards the environmental contamination.

Quality Control Standards

Finally, there are quality control standards that it must follow to ensure that good quality food products are supplied to the consumers. The ingredients used for manufacturing foods should be tested and harmless. Before packaging different food products, they must be tested to ensure that they have right taste and quality.

Besides, there are food packaging and transportation standards set by the food organizations. Consumers around the world must also keep these standards in mind while choosing the manufacturers whose food products they must buy.

Anamika Swami has wide knowledge of B2B Marketplace and Business industries. Get latest updates on Food manufacturers which are of great demand in B2B space.You can find more free information about Trade Leads at Trade.indiaMART.com
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Anamika_Swami/720304

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